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Digital Freedom and Privacy

What Are You Searching For?

Porn-wise, natch, not “where’s the best doughnut shop?” or “what the hell is Instagram really FOR??”

Some of the answers surprised even me, a long-time curator of a fairly wide variety of porny GIFs (there are now well over 4,000 GIFs stashed all around the site.) I will admit, though, that most of the content here is probably pretty mainstream – in part because I’m not interested in getting prosecuted for a hobby.

The internet knows, because of course, what you all are searching for, and not just on Pornhub (that’s material for another pretty humorous post….)

This came to my attention through an article in The Atlantic, discussing and laying out an interview by article author Olga Khazan with book author, and former Google data scientist, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz. The article, Our Searches, Ourselves is a good read in general, and the book, Everybody Lies,is at the top of my to-get list.

Khazan writes:

Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, a former data scientist at Google, used his data-analysis skills to learn what was really on Americans’ minds. The result … shows how the terms and questions people type into search engines don’t at all match what they claim on surveys.

“So for example,” he told me recently, “there have historically been more searches for porn than for weather.” But just 25 percent of men and 8 percent of women will admit to survey researchers that they watch porn.

So, what are some of the findings that struck me? Let’s take rough sex, which is politically incorrect these days for sure.

gif of blonde gasping as she is roughly fucking from behind

Continue reading →

Your Devices Are Whispering – and you can’t hear them

Occasionally, VERY occasionally, I visit the subject of digital freedom and privacy, a topic of interest to we enjoyers of internet carnality.

Today’s post explores the latest variation of tracking – how “they” watch and use our habits and visits and clicks from our email and web site views, and build databases and profiles of us to sell us their stuff.

I wrote before about Locally Shared Objects, (LSOs), also known colloquially as “flash cookies” or “supercookies,” which can remain on a computer even if a user tells his or her browser to delete all
cookies. More on that HERE . And that’s not just on desktops; just for one example, did you know that Verizon’s supercookies (also known as zombiecookies) – a snippet of code injected into mobile users’ web requests — silently identify and track its customers, sharing the information with AOL’s wide-reaching ad network? Continue reading →